Can I please have award with you?

Sorry for the delay in blog posts. Not only have I been busy with writing every day and analyzing it afterward, but I’ve also been helping my wife with short film stuff and dealing with my car needing some service (I require a new radiator before it stops… radiating).

Last week, I was kindly nominated for a couple of different blog awards by Jae of Lit and Scribbles and Nathan of The Writer’s Codex. These are two very awesome people willing to put themselves out there and share their thoughts on a multitude of things, but mainly writing. I highly recommend checking out their blogs, if you haven’t already.

I decided to take these two award nominations and pull from them what I thought may interest you guys:

  • Post five favorite books. Of course this is always changing and never limited to five, but I’ll share some that have affected me in one way or another.
  • Post seven random thoughts about yourself. That should be easy. Sometimes to my detriment, I think of random things all day long.

Enough delay. On with the show (these are in no particular order):

A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin

Obviously this is a hot series. I’d heard of it before, but it wasn’t until HBO ran their interpretation that I became intrigued. I finished the existing five books within a span of two months. That’s pretty good for me. I really couldn’t get enough of this epic story, and though not perfect, the characters and world just sucked me in. I can understand the fervor behind those awaiting the rest of the series.

How to Read a Book by Mortimer J. Adler and Charles Van Doren

This is one of those books that should be read at least once a year. Of course, this is coming from someone that hasn’t read it in several. But just because I don’t take my vitamins doesn’t mean I don’t realize they’re good for you. This book is filled with tried and true principles for anyone seeking to improve their reading experiences and I promise you, if you remain open and allow this book to modify your habits, it will do wonders.

The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers

I only happened upon this book because I was enamored with local author James P. Blaylock. It turned out that he belonged to a trio of authors, Tim Powers being one of them, that were personally mentored by the late Philip K. Dick. The Anubis Gates seemed to have no dearth of fans and so it soon found its way into my library. The story is one of time travel, Egyptian gods, 19th century London, poetry, and magic. For some reason, it’s really stuck with me since reading it a couple years ago.

Worldwar series by Harry Turtledove

There are two subjects I can spend endless amounts of time reading about – science and history. When I was in my last couple years of college and discovered the existence of a genre called Alternate History, my world quickly turned upside down. An alien invasion force arriving just as World War II is mid-frenzy? Where do I sign up?

The first book to open my eyes to the possibilities was Colonization: Second Contact, the fifth book in this series of eight. I promptly hopped onto Amazon and picked up the rest.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain

Samuel Clemens was a brilliant man. If I owned one one-hundredth of his wit, I would be a rich man indeed. This is the first book I read by him (or at least that I can remember… I may have been forced to read Huckleberry Finn in grade school, when I just didn’t ‘get it’). If I could sit down and chat with any person in history, Twain would be in my top three.

Seven random things about me:

  1. I’m a foodie. Crepes for breakfast, Banh Mi for lunch. Chicken Tikka Masala for dinner. Sounds like a good day to me. But I’m not a food snob. Sometimes I just want a peanut butter and jelly sandwich with a bag of chips (crisps for my British friends).
  2. I compose music. I always have some sort of beat or melody or harmony running in my head. Sometimes they go away on their own, but a lot of times they haunt me until I get them recorded on my audio workstation (read as souped up PC). The problem I have here is the same with my writing — I hardly ever finish what I start.
  3. I love all things grape flavored. Kool-aid, gatorade, chewing gum. I seem to be the only one I know that isn’t repulsed by it.
  4. I often wish I had joined a branch of the military. I enjoyed my time in college and certainly learned a lot, but I’ve always admired those that put their lives on the line and serve. There always seemed to be a sense of brotherliness there as well that is hard to obtain in a civilian setting. A part of me wishes that I could have had that experience.
  5. I used to be passionate about working in IT. I still enjoy some aspects, but the level of love I had for this career certainly isn’t where it used to be. I suppose it’s just an inevitable jadedness cultivated over time.
  6. I developed a love of stories from my dad. When I was younger and my dad would put me and my brother to bed, he wouldn’t bother with books. He’d make up a story on the spot and me and my brother would always be characters. It was awesome.
  7. Bacon. Enough said, really.

-beatbox32

0 thoughts on “Can I please have award with you?”

  1. I, too, like things grape flavored. I’m also odd in that I don’t mind the taste of cough syrup.

    Nice book choices too. GRRM is a given, but nice Mark Twain nod on the end there. I take it you’ve read most of Heinlein’s stuff?

    Oh, and congrats on your awards!

    1. Funny what you say about cough syrup. That’s the reason I’m told most often by people that don’t like grape flavor – it tastes like cough syrup. I’m with you, don’t mind it at all. Must be some genetic switch that was turned on!

      I’ve read The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (loved it of course) and Job: A Comedy of Justice. Two very different books from different points in his career, but I enjoyed them both. I need to read more of his stuff (I say that a lot about many authors).

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